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5 reasons to become manager of the Blues

By Terry Baddoo




LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 25: Fans protest over the sacking of previous manager Roberto di Matteo during the Barclays Premier League match between Chelsea and Manchester City at Stamford Bridge on November 25, 2012 in London, England
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 25: Fans protest over the sacking of previous manager Roberto di Matteo during the Barclays Premier League match between Chelsea and Manchester City at Stamford Bridge on November 25, 2012 in London, England

You don’t even have to like the club to manage it.

You’re never going to become synonymous with the club like Fergie, Wenger or Moyes at their respective homes, so there’s no need for any disingenuous pledge of allegiance. Everyone knows you’re mainly there for the money.

Just recently, Benitez told the world that Real Madrid is his sweetheart club. Okay, it was a strange statement to make when he supposedly had hopes of staying at the Bridge, but it didn’t exactly come as a shocker. Chelsea, under Abramovich, is a business. There is no room or in fact need for sentiment.  Of course, the Pensioners have a rich history, “Blue is the color, football is the game,” and all that.  But aside from Roberto di Matteo, none of the managers who’ve worked under Abramovich had any obvious knowledge of the club’s past when they came, and were never given time to develop any real affinity with the Chelsea tradition before they left.

Jose Mourinho might argue differently, and some think he’ll prove it by returning some day, but, to-date, the guy in the Abramovich era who undisputedly had blue blood in his veins was Ray Wilkins, who was given one game in temporary charge and was subsequently sacked. So it’s ok to be a mercenary as Chelsea boss. You’re expendable, so why not?