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Brown Seeks Fresh Start With Bolts

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Chargers wideout Vincent Brown (r.), who missed all of the 2011 season due to a broken left ankle, is healthy and hoping to contribute to San Diego's offense this year. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
Chargers wideout Vincent Brown (r.), who missed all of the 2011 season due to a broken left ankle, is healthy and hoping to contribute to San Diego's offense this year. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

Vincent Brown is ready to play.

After missing the entire 2012 season due to a broken left ankle, the former San Diego State wideout has been eagerly awaiting his return to the field.  

“He’s finally healthy,” said quarterback Philip Rivers. “I know it’s been a long road for him to get back on the field and feel a part of it. He was going to be a huge part of it last year. … He looks good. He looks fresh and not that he was ever moping around, but you can tell the life is back in him from getting to feel a part of it and he certainly is a part of it.”

I’ll second that.

Brown was impressive last year in training camp, and hopes were high for his second NFL season. But, with a new coaching staff, and a new playbook this year, Brown is basically starting from square one.

 “New offense so we’re all trying to get the timing down,” Brown said. “Everyone’s trying to get work and get that down as fast as possible. … Everything’s flying at times, but it’s all a part of the process so just trying to get everything down as fast as you can.”

He has a little more than a month to continue learning the new playbook. The biggest concern, however, is that he hasn’t played in a real game since the Chargers hosted the Dallas Cowboys in their second preseason game last year.

Wide receiver is already one of the most difficult positions to learn in the NFL, and Brown has all of four starts and 19 receptions in his career. However, his tenacity and physical tools are promising.  

“He’s got big, strong hands and he really goes and gets the ball,” Rivers said.  “And I don’t mean jumping up and getting it, he’ll do that, too. I just mean he’s aggressive to the ball when it’s on the way. When it’s on the way, he protects the throw, and that’s big when you’re developing a trust because you want to throw them good all the time, but when you don’t, he’s going to help you and bail you out.”

Not that Rivers needed any help last year.