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College Football Hall of Fame: Legacy Of Inductees

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Former CU coach Bill McCartney dominates any talk of Colorado football legacy and tradition. Tim Defrisco/ALLSPORT.
Former CU coach Bill McCartney dominates any talk of Colorado football legacy and tradition. Tim Defrisco/ALLSPORT.

TED BROWN, N.C. STATE

Once told that he was too small and too short to play college football, Brown went on to become the ACC's all-time leading rusher during his career (5,001 yards).

For a long time, football has been known as a big-man's game. But Brown proved that even the smallest of men could make a difference in football. Just ask Barry Sanders.

JERRY GRAY, TEXAS

Gray was a member of one of the greatest defenses of all time in 1983. He was twice named conference defensive player of the year and was named to the All-American team twice.

During his career, Gray was known for his big hits, doing the same things players like Troy Polamalu do today.

STEVE MEILINGER, KENTUCKY

Meilinger was a selection by the veteran's committee. He played under Paul "Bear" Bryant from 1951-53, earning All-American honors twice.

Kentucky's athletics website describes him best:

Known as "Mr. Anywhere" for the Wildcats, he split time between end, halfback and quarterback on offense; on defense, he played end, linebacker and defensive back – basically, every position on the field except the interior offensive and defensive lines, a remarkable combination.  On special teams, he was a two-year starting punter and also returned punts and returned kickoffs.

ROD SHOATE, OKLAHOMA

Shoate was as dominant as they came on Oklahoma's defense in the '70s. He was twice named conference player of the year and ranks third in school history in tackles (420).

PERCY SNOW, MICHIGAN STATE

Snow doesn't get a lot of credit outside of the state of Michigan, but he brought a lot to the Spartan defense.

He was the first player to win the Butkus (top linebacker) and Lombardi (top lineman) awards in the same year, and was named an All-American twice.

DON TRULL, BAYLOR

When you think of Baylor, most will go to Robert Griffin III. However, Trull is one that most fans will instantly recognize.

He passed for more than 4,000 yards and 27 touchdowns in his career (a large number in the 1960s), and was named an All-American in 1963.

BILL McCARTNEY, COLORADO

McCartney turned the Colorado football program around, transforming the Buffs into a contender during the late 1980s and early 1990s.

McCartney was 7-25-1 in his first three seasons (1982-84) in Boulder. In today's time, that would have earned him a quick ticket out of town. However, administrators stuck with him and he rewarded their patience with a shared national title in 1990.

He left a winning legacy in Boulder. While there have been struggles during the last few years, fans will always remember what he was able to bring to the program.

WAYNE HARDIN, NAVY AND TEMPLE

While at Navy, Hardin won five straight over rival Army, a feat that wasn't accomplished again until 2007. However, when you look at who his quarterbacks were, you'll understand why. Heisman Trophy winners Joe Bellino and Roger Staubach both played for Hardin, helping the program succeed.

When he moved on to Temple, Hardin compiled 80 wins, which is still the most in school history.

He left a lasting impact on both programs, becoming one of the most beloved coaches at both schools.