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Ducks Will Face NCAA Music Wednesday

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Chip Kelly talks to the media after being introduced as the new head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles during a news conference at the team's NovaCare Complex on Jan. 17. On Wednesday, Kelly and the University of Oregon will find out what penalties the NCAA has in mind for the Ducks for violations committed during Kelly's time at Oregon. Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images.
Chip Kelly talks to the media after being introduced as the new head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles during a news conference at the team's NovaCare Complex on Jan. 17. On Wednesday, Kelly and the University of Oregon will find out what penalties the NCAA has in mind for the Ducks for violations committed during Kelly's time at Oregon. Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images.

The day of days is finally at hand for the Oregon football team and former coach Chip Kelly. The NCAA Committee on Infractions informed the university that it would hand down its findings Wednesday, ending an investigation that has lasted more than two years.

Early Tuesday, the committee indicated that its report had been finalized and was ready for release during a conference call with media Wednesday. It is likely the university has received a preliminary report, though it probably won't get the full report until Wednesday's full disclosure by the committee.

At issue is recruiting practices, particularly as they relate to Willie Lyles and materials he delivered to the University of Oregon football program that seemed substandard for the amount the program paid. The investigation also looked into Lyles and his relationship with several Southwest-area high school recruits, including Lache Seastrunk, who landed at the University of Oregon for two seasons before transferring to Baylor.

Also on the table is the allegation that Oregon's football staff made hundreds of impermissible recruiting calls and an accusation that the program failed to monitor its recruiting process successfully. Oregon admitted to committing violations in the fall, but disagreed with some of the language being used during an attempt at creating a summary disposition. That led to a meeting with the Committee on Infraction in April.

Once the Ducks get their hands on the report, they will have 15 days to file an appeal if they disagree with the findings. The Ducks have maintained that errors were made in the recruiting process, but have also stood firm that the program's coaches did nothing intentionally that would constitute an unfair advantage over another program.

While negotiating the failed summary agreement in the spring, Oregon proposed self-imposed penalties of giving up one scholarship a year for two years, a voluntary reduction of a recruiting class for one year, limits on recruiting visits and two years probation.

On Wednesday, it's likely the Ducks will get a little bit of everything, though a postseason or TV ban seems unlikely.