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McCoy Charges Up A New Offense In SD

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The Chargers offense is in store for some tinkering. Photo by Rich Schultz /Getty Images.
The Chargers offense is in store for some tinkering. Photo by Rich Schultz /Getty Images.

Among the many changes at Chargers Park this year, only one is of true consequence.

Installing the new offense.

It’s no easy task for anyone, but head coach Mike McCoy’s success as the offensive coordinator in Denver, particularly with three very different quarterbacks in Kyle Orton, Tim Tebow and Peyton Manning, is proof of his ability to shape offensive schemes to specific player skill sets.

And for the fourth straight year, McCoy is once again building his offense around a different quarterback. But, as Philip Rivers stated after the first mini-camp practice, some elements of the old offense will remain.

“It’s been nice that they’ve (McCoy and offensive coordinator Ken Whisenhunt) been receptive to some of the things we’ve done previously, whether it be a word — 'Hey we called it this' or 'we ran this exact same play and we called it this' — certain things that we’ve done for so long. It’s most certainly Whiz’s (Ken Whisenhunt’s) and coach’s offense, but it’s been nice to at least have some input as far as certain little tweaks.”

How those “certain little tweaks” will be implemented remains to be seen, and we won’t really know until the Chargers suit up against the Seattle Seahawks in their first preseason game.

However, the fact that McCoy has accepted input from his quarterback is a good thing. Getting Rivers, a four-time Pro Bowler, to buy in is a crucial first step.  

But it’s no secret McCoy still has his work cut out for him. From 2004-11, the Chargers offense ranked fifth or better in total points scored. Last season, San Diego fell to 20th. Moreover, this year the Chargers could have as many as five new starters on offense.

But perhaps the right combination of new players and coaches, along with experienced veterans, can create something entirely new and dangerous.

“What I appreciate is what we’ve done here over nine years hasn’t just gone down the wayside,” Rivers said. “It’s taking into account that we’ve done some good things here over the years. If you look at all that and try to formulate a system from all that, good luck trying to figure out what we’re running.”