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NCAA Adds New Football Recruiting Rules

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The NCAA Division I Board of Directors adopted five new rules regarding football recruits that will be effective immediately. Photo By Cyrus McCrimmon/Getty Images.
The NCAA Division I Board of Directors adopted five new rules regarding football recruits that will be effective immediately. Photo By Cyrus McCrimmon/Getty Images.

After months of research involving surveys of both student-athletes and coaches, the NCAA Division I Board of Directors adopted five new football recruiting rules Wednesday that will be effective immediately.

The first rule change, according to NCAA.org, allows FBS players to better prepare for the season during an eight-week period each summer by participating in eight hours per week of required weight training and conditioning. Up to two of the eight hours can be film review. The student-athletes who participate in this must be enrolled in summer school or meet specific academic benchmarks.

The second change prohibits a school's staff members from attending all-star games and activities associated with those games. It also prohibits the staff members from having in-person contact with recruits participating in the games from the time the recruit arrives at the event until he returns to his home or school.

Rule three establishes a dead period during which no in-person recruiting can take place. The dead period begins the Monday of the week in which mid-year junior college transfers can begin signing the National Letter of Intent, and ends the Wednesday of the week of the AFCA convention. For 2013-14, the dead period falls Dec. 16 through Jan. 15.

The fourth rule change establishes a 14-day dead period in late June and early July for Football Bowl Subdivision schools. 

The last rule change allows schools to pay for meals for up to four family members who accompany the recruit on an official visit. The rules previously allowed schools to pay for meals for only the recruit and his parents, legal guardians, spouse or children. 

Although these rules are not game-changers, those who recommended the changes, according to NCAA.org, believe that they will help protect the integrity of the recruiting process as well as promote a healthy recruiting environment for both the football coaches and the recruits.