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Suspended QB Golson Indicates He Cheated On Test

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Everett Golson led Notre Dame to the BCS championship, then got suspended from the university for an apparent violation of the school's honor code due to some sort of cheating on a test. Photo by Ronald C. Modra/Getty Images.
Everett Golson led Notre Dame to the BCS championship, then got suspended from the university for an apparent violation of the school's honor code due to some sort of cheating on a test. Photo by Ronald C. Modra/Getty Images.

Suspended Notre Dame quarterback Everett Golson indicated he cheated on a test last spring in a Sports Illustrated video posted Tuesday.

Golson, who has been suspended for the fall semester for what previously was reported as an academic issue, led the team to the BCS title game last year and has two years of eligibility remaining. He's kept in touch with coach Brian Kelly and hopes to re-enroll at the university.

"Basically I had poor judgment on a test. It wasn't due to poor grades or anything like that," Golson said on the video.

Asked point-blank if he cheated on a test, Golson shrugged.

"Yeahhh, something like that," he said.

Asked again, "What happened?" Golson still didn't want to give an exact account.

"I mean, that's what it was. Like I said, I'm just going to leave it at poor judgment."

Golson also said his decision was in violation of the honor code at Notre Dame and that it was "humbling" to watch the Fighting Irish (6-2) play this season.

He currently is training in San Diego with esteemed quarterback coach George Whitfield.

Listed at 6-foot, 185 pounds, Golson started 11 games last year, including the BCS championship against Alabama, and won 10. He completed 58.8 percent of his passes for 7.6 yards per attempt and ran for nearly 300 yards and six touchdowns.

Senior Tommy Rees, who backed up Golson last year, has put up better numbers this season, throwing for 7.9 yards per attempt and posting 20 touchdown passes in just eight games. Still, Notre Dame has lost to Michigan and Oklahoma after an unbeaten regular season a year ago.

Golson could've decided to play at a junior college this fall or transfer to another university and play next season in a different uniform, but never gave it much thought.

"My heart was set on going back to Notre Dame. Not necessarily to prove to anybody, or ... just really doing it for me," Golson said. "I feel like that's something that I started and I didn't want to run away from it and go to a JUCO or go to another school. I was gonna face it."

In all likelihood, Golson will be Notre Dame's starting quarterback next year.

It's a positive story for college football in a year that Sports Illustrated released a massive five-part series alledging Oklahoma State commmitted all of the conceivable black-eye violations under Les Miles and now Mike Gundy, including money, drugs, sex, academics and boosters. Miami just escaped major penalties likely due to the NCAA's mistakes during its investigation, and the recent sex abuse scandal at Penn State still rings clear in the minds of fans and media.

From a certain perspective, it's sad, because a university shouldn't be congratulated for suspending a student for any form of blatant academic fraud, quarterback or not. But there are some cynics, or perhaps realists, who would suggest many universities would find a way not to suspend its star quarterback on a team contending for national titles.

It's good to see an example of real consequence where academics and integrity were valued more than wins and revenue in college football.