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Troubled 2000 FSU Class Suggests Winston Will Be Fine

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Jameis Winston has had his fair share of legal trouble, but as we've seen from other Seminoles in the past, that may not matter in a decade or so. Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images.
Jameis Winston has had his fair share of legal trouble, but as we've seen from other Seminoles in the past, that may not matter in a decade or so. Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images.

Believe it or not, the Florida State Seminoles have run into the law before. Whether it be kickers with a propensity for bar brawls, wide receivers who technically committed grand theft, or "forgetful" quarterbacks shopping at Publix, the program has had its fair share of run-ins with the Tallahassee police.

It becomes the subject of over-analyzing when it happens and again when the draft comes around, assuming the player is an NFL prospect. Several media outlets will have experts come on and discuss the questionable character of a young man based on his actions between the ages of 18 and 22. Some undoubtedly will argue that incidents with the law warrant second-guessing.

For Jameis Winston, that talk won't come for another year at least. However, many will label his behavior as egregious and even suggest Winston should get the Dez Bryant treatment and get a 24-hour babysitter

To be clear, this entire post and my next question goes for everything outside of the sexual assault allegation Winston faced. That's a serious allegation that many people seemed to botch, including those investigating it. I'll refrain from providing any more thoughts on a situation that has been the subject of endless analysis.

These other incidents — the soda at Burger King, the BB gun fight, and most recently the stolen crab legs — leave me with one question: Who really cares? Ten years from now, who will remember the mistakes a talented football player made while in college? More than likely they'll only come up as a way to juxtapose his life as a professional and college athlete. We've seen this from Florida State athletes before. Whether it's right or not, football ability sometimes erases past actions. Look no further than the group of Seminoles drafted in 2000.