Crystal Palace

Founded In
London, England

Crystal Palace

About Crystal Palace

Crystal Palace Football Club was founded in 1905 by the builders working on The Crystal Palace. Nicknamed The Eagles, the club joined the Football League at the start of the 1920–21 season and gained promotion up to the Second Division in their first season. Since the 1970s, Brighton & Hove Albion Football Club have been the club's biggest rival, despite the two teams being located around 40 miles apart.

Since first joining the Football League, the team has developed a reputation as a "yo yo club", suffering many relegations but also bouncing back up with promotions as well. This is best demonstrated by the fact that, since the formation of the Premier League in 1992, Crystal Palace have been relegated from and promoted to the top division four times.

Crystal Palace reached the FA Cup final in 1990, drawing 3-3 with Manchester United after extra time in one of the classic cup matches. The replay ended in a 1-0 loss for Palace. The following year, Crystal Palace returned to Wembley Stadium to contest the Full Members Cup final, a tournament designed after English clubs were banned from European competition. The match once again ended in a draw after 90 minutes, but Palace stormed to victory in extra time, with Ian Wright bagging two goals in an eventual 4-1 win. To date, it remains the club's only major cup win.

Legendary former players include Nigel Martyn, Kenny Sansom, Andrew Johnson, Chris Coleman and Ian Wright, who scored over 100 goals for the club, making him the club's record post-war goalscorer.

Since 1924, the team has played its home matches at Selhurst Park, an all-seater stadium with a capacity of 26,309. The ground's record attendance was set in 1979, prior to the implementation of seating, at 51,801. From 1985-1991 the ground was shared with Charlton Athletic and from 1991-2003 Wimbledon also played their matches at Selhurst Park. The stadium is also noteworthy for being the first London ground to host Real Madrid and for staging two competitions at the 1948 Summer Olympics.