River Plate

Founded In
Montevideo, Uruguay

River Plate

About River Plate

Club Atlético River Plate de Montevideo was founded in 1932, as a result of a union between Capurro and Olimpia, two former clubs from the area. Although they have never won a Uruguayan league title, they have occasionally competed for the major honours on offer in the country and have also represented Uruguay on the international stage. Their main rivals are the other major clubs from the same neighbourhood, Montevideo Wanderers and Bella Vista.

Over the years, the team have endured several relegations and have subsequently spent many seasons in the lower divisions of Uruguay's league system. In total, the club have finished top of the second division, known as the Segunda División, on six occasions, with those league wins coming in 1943, 1967, 1978, 1984, 1991 and 2004.

River Plate's best performance in the Primera División came in the 1992 season, where they mounted a serious title challenge, before finishing the campaign in second place, five points behind the eventual winners, Nacional. The team also produced impressive form in the 2007-08 season and ended up in third place in the final league table. In terms of international competitions, River Plate have competed in the Copa Sudamericana four times since their first appearance in 2008. Their best performance came during the 2009 edition of the competition, where they reached the semi-final stage before being eliminated.

Throughout history, many of the country's top talents have represented River Plate. In the early decades, players like Hector Sena Puricelli and Severino Varela starred for the team. Notable players from more recent times include Juan Ramón Carrasco, Diego López, Gustavo Poyet and Robert Mario Flores.

The team's home matches are hosted at the Estadio Parque Federico Omar Saroldi, usually known by the shorter name of Estadio Saroldi. The venue was once known as Olimpia Park, but adopted its current name after the tragic death of River Plate goalkeeper, Federico Omar Saroldi. It has a seated capacity of 6,000.